40 schools get funding from the South Australian government for rooftop solar installations.

South-Australia-to-Install-Rooftop-Solar-in-40-Different-Schools

40 South Australian schools are about to go solar. The state government announced a $15 million fund for a rooftop solar project. The project seeks to reduce power costs of the schools. It’s also an attempt to promote clean energy and therefore reduce carbon emissions in the state.

In addition to 40 schools, another 200 schools will get a solar assistance of $250,000 from the government. The fund hopes to improve the energy efficiency of the schools through retrofitting of LED lighting. For state education minister Susan Close, it’s the “kind of investment which pays for itself in the long run.”

Benefits of rooftop solar

With the new rooftop solar, schools can dedicate more time to programs that benefit students. They will have significantly reduced electricity bills to worry about. Collectively, the project also gives savings of over $2 million. And this amount all goes to SA public schools.

Aside from costs and environmental benefits, it will also boost the local economy as the project creates 38 full-time jobs.

Praises for the solar project

Solar and climate advocacy groups praised the project. It shows SA’s commitment to renewable energy use and sets an example for other states to follow. It’s also a timely move as the federal government faces criticisms on renewable power leadership.

Solar Citizens campaigner, Dan Spencer, said that it is states like SA who are picking up the slack and driving Australia’s transition to clean power while the federal government continues to play politics with energy.

He added that schools are hubs for local communities and installing solar arrays on 40 schools will not only reduce pollution, school power bills, and create jobs, it will give students and local communities a taste of a future powered by clean energy.

The schools are a great addition to SA solar properties. Currently, 25 percent of South Australian households are already solar-powered.